Canada Fraud Prevention Month - XTN Cognitive Security

Canada Fraud Prevention Month

Learn to recognize the most common threats and fraud and avoid being victims.
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March is Fraud Prevention Month across Canada. We take a chance to remind everyone how crucial it is to be aware of cybercrime threats that can happen to you daily. Educate yourself about common threats to avoid becoming one of the victims.

SOCIAL ENGINEERING

Social engineering is a manipulation technique that exploits human error to access valuable private information. Learn more here and here.

PHISHING

Phishing is the #1 cause of cyber incidents. Phishing usually targets you using emails, SMS, or phone by an attacker, pretending to be someone you trust. The first rule is never to tell anyone your Bank PIN!

Learn more about Phishing, how it can threaten you, and how to recognize it.

MALWARE

Financial malware is a dangerous malware designed to steal financial information and money from victims’ accounts. The main targets are mobile or web applications, such as online banking.

Learn more about banking malware, RAT, Mobile Overlay attacks, how to avoid installing mobile malware on your phone or being a victim of an SMS grabbing attack, or watch the demo about mobile malware.

ACCOUNT TAKEOVER (ATO)

Account takeover is a form of identity theft and fraud, where an attacker successfully gains access to a user’s account credentials. Often the ATOs are the result of data breaches, phishing or overlay attacks accomplished.

Learn more here and here.

MONEY MULE

A Money Mule is a person who transfers money acquired illegally electronically on behalf of others, obtaining a commission for it. The illegal cash often originates from criminal activities such as phishing, malware attacks, e-commerce fraud, CEO fraud, to name a few.

Learn more here.

CEO FRAUD

If your CEO sends you an email asking you to make an urgent payment, would you be suspicious about it? Maybe not, but you should because the sender may not be your boss, and you could be a victim of a C-level attack.

Learn more here.

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